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PSYCHIATRIC REHABILITATION VALUES

In the early 1990’s a director of the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation from Boston University
made appearances at a number of conferences and seminars around the country. His name was
William “Bill” Anthony. He was in the forefront of the mental health recovery movement. Bill
spoke in terms of ‘recovery’ from mental illness and promoted concepts like ‘wellness’ and ‘hope’.
During the 1970’s and early 80’s institutionalization was still the norm for many persons with
‘serious and persistent mental illness’. Deinstitutionalization began in Indiana in 1983, when BS
level staff was hired to conduct community surveys. Their job was to identify the type of services
necessary to sustain persons with mental illness in the community. Initial services consisted of
residential programs and day programs. Eventually vocational services along with communitybased
case management came into being. By 1993 the State of Indiana introduced Medicaid
Rehabilitation Option funding, making it possible for all mental health centers around the state to
expand from 1 case manager per county to multiple case managers for adults. Then by 1997
children and adolescents received financial coverage.

The VALUES of Psychiatric Rehabilitation* took us from day treatment services that provided an
ADL maintenance mentality to ushering in the first Clubhouse in Indiana, with an emphasis on the
following:

  • FUNCTIONING – a focus on competency in all areas of life
  • ENVIRONMENT – programming with ‘real world’ context, known as the ‘in vivo’ experience
  • OUTCOME – evaluating clients’ success based on the accountability of the rehabilitation deliverer
  • ORIENTATION – judging the usefulness of technique by its impact on client outcome
  • CLIENT INVOLVEMENT – focus on the participation by the client in selecting his/her own goals
  • CHOICE – allowing the client to determine his/her success and satisfaction measures
  • COMPREHENSIVENESS – a holistic view of persons served: mind, body, spirit
  • SUPPORT – providing assistance and reinforcement as long as needed
  • GROWTH POTENTIAL – a focus on the inherent capacity of any person to improve and grow; an attitude of hope
  • INDIVIDUALIZATION – respecting a person’s unique differences and developing specificity as a means of distinguishing among people.

*Farkas, M.D. and Anthony, W.A.(1989)Psychiatric Rehabilitation Programs: Putting Theory into Practice. Baltimore,
Johns Hopkins University Press

It is this approach, along with CARF standards of care that has provided the underpinning of
service philosophy and practices at Northeastern Center, Inc. Each year, as we recognize
MAY as MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS MONTH, let us remind ourselves that our valuesdriven,
consumer-focused recovery models continue to provide the best outcomes for all persons
served.
Submitted by: Sue Sprague, LCSW

Mental Health Awareness

Mental health is essential to everyone’s overall health and well-being, and mental illnesses are common and treatable. But people experience symptoms of mental illnesses differently—and some engage in potentially dangerous or risky behaviors to avoid or cover up symptoms of a potential mental health problem.

Sometimes people struggling with mental health concerns develop habits and behaviors that increase the risk of developing or exacerbating mental illnesses, or could be signs of mental health problems themselves.

May is Mental Health Month; Northeastern Center is raising awareness of Risky Business (#riskybusiness). The campaign is meant to educate and inform individuals dealing with a mental health concern understand that some behaviors and habits can be detrimental to recovery—or even mask a deeper issue—but that seeking help is nothing to be ashamed of.

Take the interactive quiz at www.mentalhealthamerica.net/whatstoofar and tell us when you think behaviors or habits go from being acceptable to unhealthy.

Northeastern Center wants everyone to know that mental illnesses are real, that recovery is always the goal, and that even if you or someone you love are engaging in risky behavior, there is help. It is important to understand early symptoms of mental illness and know when certain behaviors are potentially signs of something more.

We need to speak up early and educate people about risky behavior and its connection to mental illness—and do so in a compassionate, judgment-free way.

When we engage in prevention and early identification, we can help reduce the burden of mental illness by identifying symptoms and warning signs early—and provide effective treatment Before Stage 4.

Genoa Pharmacy

Genoa Pharmacy opening soon in the Northeastern Center’s Kendallville Outpatient office.

The pharmacy is designed especially for consumers of

Northeastern Center and will offer the following services:

  • Great time savings.
    Fast medication pick-up saves you at stop!
  • Refills can be sent to your home at no extra cost.
  • Help with your insurance plans.
  • We can fill all your medications
  • After-hour on-call services.
  • Packaging that helps you take your medications

Full-Service Pharmacy

Kendallville Police & NEC Launch “We Can Help” – Addiction Assistance Program

we can help logo

Substance Abuse is a top concern around the state and country. That holds true for Noble County and the city of Kendallville as well. “Costs are not only financial but also in terms of broken families and lives”, said Steve Howell, Chief Clinical Officer, Northeastern Center. “Recognizing the problem, however, is only part of the challenge. Too frequently, those who want help don’t know where to go.” Working together, the Kendallville Police Department (KPD) and Northeastern Center (NEC) are promoting the “We Can Help” partnership initiative. The primary objective is to help individual’s access substance abuse treatment services quickly and easily.

The Kendallville Police Department is focused on providing the best service possible to the citizens of Kendallville. As part of this goal we feel strongly that we have an opportunity to help those citizens who are struggling with the battle against drug and alcohol addiction because we often have contact with them when they are at their lowest point. The Kendallville Police Department and the Northeastern Center have collaborated to offer a program to those suffering from drug and alcohol addiction that will provide an opportunity for them to immediately receive help with their addiction from trained counselors and advocates from Northeastern Center. “We believe the ability to offer actual face-to-face help for those battling addiction that our Officers come in contact with, no matter what time of day or night, will assure a much greater chance of rehabilitation success,” according to Kendallville Police Chief Rob Wiley. “The goal of the Kendallville Police Department is to be a significant part of providing a better life for our community, including those ready to face their drug and alcohol addiction.”

By initiating contact with KPD individuals will be put in touch with a substance abuse professional immediately. It is critical that the individual initiate the contact rather than KPD. The official launch date of the “We Can Help” program is Thursday, September 1, 2016. Individuals seeking assistance may also contact NEC Emergency Solutions directly 24-hours a day at 1-800-790-0118.

Dottie Fuentes & Daina Ball

NORTHEASTERN CENTER AWARDS 2016 JANE GEORGE SCHOLARSHIP TO AREA GRADUATE

Northeastern Center has awarded the 2016, $750 Jane George Scholarship to Daina Ball from Angola, Indiana.

Daina graduated this spring from Angola High School and will be pursuing a degree in Psychology from Alma College located in Alma Michigan.

Dottie Fuentes, Northeastern Center’s Steuben County Clinical Director, presented the award to Daina.

College-bound seniors from Steuben, LaGrange, DeKalb, & Noble counties, considering a career in mental health were encouraged to participate in the 2016 Scholarship Contest.  Entrants were asked to submit an essay focusing on two themes:  1. “What in my life has motivated me to pursue a career in mental health.”   2. “How I plan to contribute to the future of mental health.”  Judges made up of Northeastern Center staff, selected Daina as the winner of the 2016 Scholarship.

The scholarship was created to remember Jane George, Nurse Case Manager, who was a dedicated Northeastern Center employee for more than seven years until her death from cancer in October of 2002.

 

Next years scholarship competition will begin in February and the winner will be selected in June.  Area students and teachers interested in the competition may contact Rose Ann Schutt at Northeastern Center’s Administration Building in Kendallville, Indiana (260) 347-2453.

 

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Photo Included:   Photo Subjects from Left to Right: Dottie Fuentes & Daina Ball

Mood disorders nec indiana

Mood disorder Assessment

Mood Disorder Basics
Mood disorders are a category of illnesses that describe a serious change in mood. Illnesses categorized as mood disorders include: depression, bipolar disorder, and seasonal affective disorder (SAD).  About 20% of the US population reports at least one depressive symptom in a given month.

Mood disorders are highly treatable with steps such as medication, psychotherapy (talk therapy), and lifestyle changes. Many people find that after treatment, their lives are completely normal and they are happy again.

If you think the way you are feeling may mean you have a mood disorder and that you could benefit from treatment, take a free and anonymous mental health screening at MOOD DISORDER ASSESSMENT.